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NERCC Election Results Posted by on

 Following are results from today's elections for positions on the New England Regional Council of Carpenters Executive Board. The elections were held as part of a Special Call meeting of Delegates to the New England Regional Council of Carpenters. Nominations were posted on this blog earlier in the day.

Executive Secretary-Treasurer: Mark Erlich, unopposed. One vote was cast by the Chair. Erlich elected.

President: Richard Monarca, unopposed. One vote was cast by the Chair. Monarca elected.

Vice President: Al Peciaro, 75 votes. Rick Anderson, 24 votes. Peciaro elected.

Warden: Jack Donahue, unopposed. One vote was cast by the Chair. Donahue elected.

Conductor: John Murphy, unopposed. One vote was cast by the Chair. Murphy elected.

Trustees (Three positions): Brian Richardson, 84 votes. David Palmisciano, 66 votes. Paul Lander, 63 votes. George Meadows, 35 votes. Paul Hughes, 24 votes. Richardson, Palmisciano and Lander elected.

Executive Committee (Five positions)

Thomas Flynn, Bruce Lydem, Gary DeCosta, John Leavitt and John Cunningham ran unopposed. One vote was cast by the Chair. Flynn, Lydem, DeCosta, Leavitt and Cunningham were elected.

Elected candidates were sworn into office following the reading of the results by the Election Committee and will each serve a four-year term, expiring in September 2017





NERCC election Posted by on

Nominations and election for the Executive Board of the New England Regional Council of Carpenters are being held today at a Special Call Delegates Meeting at the New England Carpenters Training Center. The following nominations have been made:
 

Executive Secretary-Treasurer
Mark Erlich, Local Union 40, nominated by Dan Kuhs, Local Union 56. Seconded by Bill Callahan, Local Union 24.

President
Richard Monarca, Local Union 24, nominated by Andy Hendrickson, Local Union 24. Seconded by John Murphy, Local Union 33.

Vice President
--Al Peciaro, Local Union 33, nominated by Brian Richardson, Local Union 56. Seconded by Michael Robinson, Local Union 24.
--Rick Anderson, Local Union 624, self-nominated. Seconded by Joe Power, Local 40.

Warden
--Local Union Jack Donahue, Local 107, nominated by Ray Bissonnette of Local Union 107. Seconded by Fred Taylor, Local 107.

Conductor
--John Murphy, Local Union 33, nominated by Tom Flynn, Local Union 67. Seconded by Richard Monarca, Local Union 24.

Trustees (3) 
--George Meadows, Local Union 43, nominated by Bill Baker, Local Union 43. Seconded by Tim Moriarty, Local Union 43.
--Brian Richardson, Local Union 56, nominated by Ted Duarte, Local Union 210. Seconded by Mynor Perez, Local Union 2168.
--Paul Lander, Local Union 94, nominated by Chris Shannon, Local Union 67. Seconded by Mike Antunes of Local Union 94.
--David Palmisciano, Local Union 94, nominated by Bill Holmes, Local Union 94. Seconded by Richard Monarca, Local Union 24.
--Paul Hughes, Local Union 218, self-nominated. Seconded by Jeff Donahue, Local Union 218.

Executive Committee (5)
--Thomas Flynn, Local Union 67, nominated by Victor Carrara of Local Union 67. Seconded by Brian Richardson, Local Union 56.
--Bruce Lydem, Local Union 24, nominated by David Jarvis, Local Union 24. Seconded by Mike Turner, Local Union 24
--Gary DeCosta, Local Union 1305, nominated by John Cunningham, Local Union 210. Seconded by John Cabral, Local Union 1305.
--John Leavitt, Local Union 1996, nominated by John Murphy, Local 33. Seconded by Jim Carey, Local 275.
--John Cunningham, Local Union 210, nominated by Gary DeCosta, Local Union 1305. Seconded by Ted Duarte, Local Union 210. 





Our Work - Fore River Bridge Replacement Posted by on

 

Learn more about the Fore River Bridge Replacement Project by clicking here to view it in our online portfolio





Enforcement against cheating businesses jumps in Mass Posted by on

More than $21 million has been collected from employers in Massachusetts who violated labor laws in the last 18 months, according to the annual report of the Joint Enforcement Task Force on the Underground Economy and Employee Misclassification. The amount represents more than the total that was recovered in all previous years.

The joint task force was created in 2008 and was a welcome development to union carpenters and others who had been working to bring attention to the issue of misclassification. Tens of millions of dollars in state and federal revenue are lost each year due to employee misclassification while employers who play by the rules are put at a competitive disadvantage and workers are stripped of essential protections such as workers' compensation coverage and eligibility for unemployment insurance, Social Security and Medicare.

The issue is especially acute in the construction industry, where the fairness of direct competitive bidding can easily be undermined by a bidder misclassifying employees as independent contractors to save 20-30% on labor cost. Perhaps the largest recent case involved more than $1.1 million in unreported wages found at the renovation of the Boston Marriott Copley Place, where one contractor was paying $4 an hour to employees who were recruited from a substance abuse program in Connecticut. Contractors were issued more than $100,000 in fines on the project.

"The work of the Task Force is invaluable in reducing the growth of the underground economy in the state's construction industry," said Mark Erlich, Executive Secretary-Treasurer of the New England Regional Council of Carpenters. "Taking on the illegal practices of wage theft, misclassification and tax and insurance fraud creates a more level playing field, which ultimately benefits legitimate employers, tradesmen and women and taxpayers."

The joint task force brings together various state agencies, including the Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development, the Attorney General's Fair Labor Division, the Insurance Fraud Bureau and others.

Both the Boston Globe and the Boston Herald covered the issue.
 





New London enacting local hire, training ordinance Posted by on

The city council of New London, Connecticut has approved an ordinance that will require contractors bidding for city construction projects valued at more than $1 million to hire local workers and provide apprenticeship training. New London Mayor Daryl Justin Finizio has pledged to sign the ordinance when it reaches his desk.

The ordinance was proposed by the New England Regional Council of Carpenters and publicly supported by members and NERCC Business Representative Chris Bachant. It passed the Administration Committee before winning a vote of the City Council the following week.

"This ordinance allows a percentage of workers from New London or New London County be required to work on a job,'' Bachant told the New London Day. "And any company working on a city project must comply with the Connecticut apprenticeship program. This is an opportunity. It's not just a job. We're offering a career."

There was opposition to the ordinance among the city council and from the editorial page of New London Day. Following the vote of the full city council, Mayor Finizio published an opinion piece in the Day rebutting criticisms of the ordinance and restating his support.

"Low bidder rules for construction projects, without the protections that this ordinance provides, favor the success of bids that use lower quality and less trained workers. While a bid awarded may, in today's dollars, be less than a union construction bid, the buildings built are not of the same quality," Finizio wrote.

"A responsible contractor ordinance, combined with appropriate budgeting for routine maintenance, will lower costs to city taxpayers in the long term by building, and maintaining, better quality buildings."
 





Carpenters Union and Hospitality Workers Union Announce Joint Endorsement of Boston City Council Candidates Posted by on

CARPENTERS UNION AND HOSPITALITY WORKERS UNION ANNOUNCE JOINT ENDORSEMENT OF BOSTON CITY COUNCIL CANDIDATES

 

Endorsement Marks Historic Coalition Between Two Organizations
September 9th, 2013 – Boston, MA - The New England Regional Council of Carpenters (NERCC) and Boston’s Local 26 (UNITE HERE) are pleased to announce their joint endorsement of several Boston City Council candidates. The endorsement is a product of the two organizations, representing over 26,000 workers, jointly interviewing City Council candidates over a series of days.

“This is more than just an endorsement of candidates for Boston City Council – this is two organizations that represent the diversity of Boston ensuring that working families will have a voice at City Hall. These are the leaders who have proven they can build strong communities,” said Brian Lang, President of Local 26 and resident of Jamaica Plain.

"We came together to consider the candidates as two unions with progressive and independent traditions. Our joint endorsements matter because, between us, we represent the full range of working families in the city," said Mark Erlich, President of the New England Regional Council of Carpenters and resident of Jamaica Plain.

The two organizations are proud to support incumbent Councilor Steven Murphy (At-Large), incumbent Councilor Ayanna Pressley (At-Large), Michelle Wu (At-Large), Michael Flaherty (At-Large), Joshua Zakim (District 8) and Timothy McCarthy (District 5).

The NERCC represents over 20,000 carpenters, pile drivers, shop & millmen, and floorcoverers working in the New England states of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont. NERCC is part of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters, one of North America’s largest building-trades unions, with nearly a half-million members in the construction and wood-products industries.

UNITE HERE Local 26 represents over 6,500 workers in the City of Boston including most of the major Boston hotels, food service workers on college campuses, convention centers, Fenway Park and Logan Airport. Boston's Local 26 is one of the most politically powerful and diverse unions in the City of Boston.

###

For more information contact Harry Grill, Political Director, Boston’s Local 26 at (617) 838-4201 or Stephen Joyce, Political Director, New England Regional Council of Carpenters at (617) 438-8011.

 





Dear Carpenters Care Posted by on

Do I need to wear sunscreen if I am not at the pool or the beach? 
This is a question we are often asked. Many of you work outside for extended hours and even though it is work and not play, the simple answer is “yes,” you should protect your skin from prolonged sun exposure. Ultra violet rays are linked to an increase in certain types of skin cancers, aging and sagging skin. This includes the skin on the top of your head and the skin under your hair. Especially for those with thinner hair, applying sunscreen or wearing a hat is the healthy choice. Wearing sunglasses with UV protection is also a good way to avoid harmful rays.

If I need to wear sunscreen, is applying once in the morning enough to protect my skin?
The brand of sunscreen you choose should come with directions on how long it lasts and when reapplication is necessary. As a general rule of thumb, reapply every four hours or after excessive sweating or swimming. Keep in mind that the sun is at its strongest from 11 AM until 2 PM. Sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of 15 or higher is recommended. There is no evidence that an SPF over 35 is beneficial.

While a sleek summer bronze may look good now, its benefits will be long forgotten years down the road if you are coping with skin disease and aging. It does not need to be a top of the line sunscreen spray bottle – it just needs to be sunscreen!

If you have a question or are interested in learning more about Carpenters Care please call 1-781-222-0930 or email infoboston@iorahealth.com.

In Health,
Your Carpenters Care Team





Enforcement against cheating businesses jumps in Mass Posted by on

More than $21 million has been collected from employers in Massachusetts who violated labor laws in the last 18 months, according to the annual report of the Joint Enforcement Task Force on the Underground Economy and Employee Misclassification. The amount represents more than the total that was recovered in all previous years.

The joint task force was created in 2008 as a result efforts by the Carpenters union and others to educate Governor Deval Patrick, state legislators and leaders of several executive branch agencies who enforce laws and policies related to employee misclassification. Tens of millions of dollars in state and federal revenue are lost each year due to employee misclassification while employers who play by the rules are put at a competitive disadvantage and workers are stripped of essential protections such as workers' compensation coverage and eligibility for unemployment insurance, Social Security and Medicare.

The issue is especially acute in the construction industry, where the fairness of direct competitive bidding can easily be undermined by a bidder misclassifying employees as independent contractors to save 20-30% on labor cost. Perhaps the largest recent case involved more than $1.1 million in unreported wages found at the renovation of the Boston Marriot Copley Place, where one contractor was paying $4 an hour to employees who were recruited from a substance abuse program in Connecticut. Contractors were issued more than $100,000 in fines on the project.

"The work of the Task Force is invaluable in reducing the growth of the underground economy in the state's construction industry,” said Mark Erlich, Executive Secretary-Treasurer of the New England Regional Council of Carpenters. “Taking on the illegal practices of wage theft, misclassification and tax and insurance fraud creates a more level playing field, which ultimately benefits legitimate employers, tradesmen and women and taxpayers."

The joint task force brings together various state agencies, including the Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development, the Attorney General’s Fair Labor Division, the Insurance Fraud Bureau and others.

Both the Boston Globe and the Boston Herald covered the issue.




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